HarvardOCS

Harvard FAS Office of Career Services

Winternship Spotlight: Jack Geary Gallery, NYC

image

If I hadn’t interned at Jack Geary Gallery in NYC, I could have never grasped the extent of the vibrant, lively gallery scene in the art world. As a History of Art and Architecture concentrator, I had focused only (and quite extensively) on art and its literature. However, my time at Jack Geary Gallery made me realize a significant part of the field that I was missing out on. Before I officially started my time in New York, I went down to Miami Art Week, and saw for the first time the absolutely exhilarating art fair scene—hopping from Art Basel Miami, Aqua Art Miami, to NADA, and working the gallery booth as well. That trip was a great introduction to my work at the gallery. I prepared for the gallery’s upcoming show on Andy Hall, a contemporary artist based in Chicago. I worked on the exhibition catalogue, designed the postcard, and wrote up précis of the exhibition. I strategized with Jack and Dolly, the wonderful owners of the gallery, on the artwork installation. I wrote the press release for the Dallas Art Fair in April, and analyzed how to best publicize the gallery. We created beautiful Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter pages. And perhaps the best part of my experience is that I was constantly moving around both physically and mentally—something that befits the fast tempo of the contemporary art world. I traversed through Chelsea, exploring some of the world-famed galleries like Gagosian. I went to the MoMA PS1 with Jack and Dolly, gasping at Mike Kelley’s brilliant, neon-hued fabric puffs. At Museo del Barrio’s Biennale, we discussed who to possibly invite to show with the gallery. I absolutely loved every single moment of this eye-opening adventure. Although my time at the gallery was a mere three weeks, this experience has not only changed my career possibilities, but also reminded me of why I love art so much.

Adela Kim ‘16
Jack Geary Gallery, NYC
Image: Preparing to unpack Andy Hall’s artworks.

image

Cynthia Meng ‘15
Max Planck Institute for Informatics
Saarbrücken, Germany                       

image

Before I came to Germany, I remember telling myself that these three months would change my life because I would finally get a chance to live on my own and be by myself for a change. After nineteen years of either living under my parents’ roof or sleeping under Harvard’s, I relished the chance to seize my independence. Cook for myself. Work by myself. Travel by myself. 

It’s a fantasy I like to play out in my head — the lone traveler, surviving on her own wits and skill. Looking back, though, I realize that I’ve in fact survived here in spite of my so-called wits and skill, constantly saved by the kindness of people around me. Nothing puts you at the mercy of others like being in a foreign country does. You depend on others entirely to show you what is custom and what is not, to give you directions in the seedy part of town after you’ve taken a wrong train, to tell you how to speak like you’re not just coming out of a first-year German class.

Read More

image

OCS adviser Heather Law has leveraged the expertise of young entrepreneurs, capturing their advice on everything from personal presentation to Facebook groups. Are there pathways into entrepreneurship? Does your concentration matter? Are there job search secrets? Their answers may surprise you!

image

Find your team.

“I would advise the seniors to team up with their friends with complementary skill sets and apply to a number of incubators where they might be able to receive a small amount of early funding to pursue the goals of their company. If the student doesn’t have a particular idea and/or doesn’t have any cofounders it might behoove them to apply to work at small startups in a hub such as San Francisco. This would allow them to see what it’s like to work in a small company. Then, eventually when they have validated their idea and assembled the beginnings of their team, they can apply to incubators.” David Renteln, Co-Founder Soylent

Always connect.

“Connect. Connect. Connect. Do not underestimate the power of connection. I know you’ve heard it all too many times before, “Network. You need to network.” Step away from what you may have been told about networking and think about it a little differently. Think of it in terms of connection. Genuinely connect with someone because you believe in their purpose, mission, or drive. Grab a coffee, tweet at them, or set up a Skype chat! If you do snag a chat with someone, live in the present and enjoy the person in front of you. Don’t treat every encounter like your next job possibility, although it may be; no one likes to be hounded for a job. Take time to appreciate the people you connect with by fully making your presence felt. If you’re used to sending ‘thank yous’ in the form of handmade cards, do that. Be as YOU as you can be. People notice these things. Plus, who doesn’t like receiving mail?” Cynthia Haas, COO, GimmeMo

Read More

image

Anne Marie Creighton
Lima, Peru

image

When my host family invited me along, I had agreed without knowing what I was agreeing to. I had recently arrived, and my Spanish was a work in progress. I understood the date, and time, but when we hopped in the taxi across town, I still didn’t know what I was going to see.

It was the end of fall in Lima, before the months-long mist of winter rolled in above the city, and the moon was out. The folding chairs in front of the stage were full, so we joined the group standing behind. Movement milled through the half-open gymnasium. Children went to play, parents following. Stands along the back sold every variety of Peruvian street food—I remember sausages, cotton candy, and flash-fried doughnuts with passionfruit syrup. It was already the liveliest elementary and middle-school talent show I had ever seen.

The MC, a teacher, walked to the microphone in heels and smiles, saying how proud she was of all the students’ talent, how grateful she was that all the parents had come. She was a familiar type; the act that followed was not.

Read More

image

They say opportunity happens when you’re in the right place at the right time; this couldn’t be more true for Rachel Silverman, Harvard alum, Wall Street Journal reporter, and current fellow at the Nieman Foundation.

An unexpected pathway

Like many students, Rachel had a dream of one day going to med school, so she studied history of science as an undergraduate. Her big break with journalism came by accident, when she took up a part time job as a research assistant. “I did research on obscure letters for a couple who did not have access to the Harvard College library system. In those days, we didn’t have Google, so I did not know who the couple was. After finishing my research, which I enjoyed, I got a phone call from my boss telling me that he was an editor at the Wall Street Journal, and he was inviting me to do a summer internship at the WSJ offices in New York City,” recalled Rachel. Nonetheless, because she was focused on going to med school, Rachel declined the offer and opted to travel to Latin America on a scholarship. After a year in Latin America, Rachel found herself unsure about what to do in life; when her previous boss called again and offered her a different project—this time—she accepted the offer, and 16 years later, she’s still at the publication.

“My first project was to do research on the past 1,000 years of business errors. I had to start at the bottom and slowly make my way to the top. I started with writing the fluffy stories on cats and that type of thing,” said Rachel, recalling her first assignments as a business reporter.

Read More

The Early Days of Family Medicine | HMS Blog

"The term “primary care” was not even widely used until the 1960s. As defined by J. Millis in a 1966 report, primary care physicians needed to focus “not upon individual organs and systems but upon the whole man… (and) serve as the primary medical resource and counselor to an individual or a family.” This was a new and even controversial statement, as medical education had gone from preparing generalist physicians to specialists, since the 1780s when HMS was founded." Read more.

Arts & Museums Fellow: Haley Adams

image

Haley Adams ‘15
Arts & Museum Fellows Program
Harvard Museum of Science and Culture
 
Although I had visited a few of the museums on Harvard’s campus before my OCS Arts & Museum Fellows placement this January, I had no idea how diverse and expansive the museum collections were! Throughout the internship, I worked with Jane Pickering, the Executive Director of the Harvard Museum of Science and Culture, which encompasses the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, the Harvard Museum of Natural History, and the Semitic Museum. I was able to meet with each department within the museum to learn more about their positions and roles. In addition, my fellow intern and I created a presentation and formal proposals synthesizing our observations and offering suggestions as to how each department could improve student awareness and engagement within the undergraduate community. Although each museum has something unique to offer, it was fascinating to see how each team worked together to create such a valuable and educational resource on campus and within the community as well.  Finally, I had the opportunity to view storage collections, preview upcoming exhibits, and tour the new Fogg Art Museum set to open this fall. Though my experience was brief, I feel I gained a real insight into the “behind-the-scenes” happenings of a museum from the inside out!

Learn more about the Arts & Museums Fellows Program:

image
 

image

From images of Mario, everyone’s favorite plumber, to shots of Bart Simpson, TV’s quintessential trouble-maker, to the beautiful landscapes that make up the worlds of Skyrim, Hyrule, and so many others, animation has certainly taken an entertainment-minded world by storm! Many aspiring young scientists love art, but finding a way to reconcile and combine these left-versus-right-brained pursuits often proves to be a difficult task.

One possibility is animation! Using your ability to model and sculpt in a computer-animated environment or draw and sketch on paper, you can combine your passions for science and art. But how does one get started?

At the Animation and Gaming panel, four specialists came together to give their advice on the field of animation. Carl Adams (Clambake Animation), Hanna Bliss (Soup2Nuts), Chris Hsu (Clambake), and Daniel Muller (New England Journal of Medicine) dished out the following:

Tips to scoring an entry-level position and being a great animator

Adams: It’s important to be organized! The job search is a lot of hustle and networking. When you talk to somebody, write down their name as well as when you talked to them. In addition, join groups that come together to talk about animation and animation job openings. They’re valuable resources.

Bliss: A lot about the field can be learned by just jumping into the game! 

Read More

Arts & Museums Fellow: Carrie Tian

image

Carrie Tian ‘15
Arts & Museum Fellows Program
Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago 

Before I learned about the OCS Arts & Museums Fellows Program, I had never considered the possibility of working in a museum. However, my time at the Field Museum opened my eyes to all of the different opportunities the museum world affords. I interned with the communications team and spent the bulk of my time working on a potential new program for the museum. I conducted market research and designed a visitor survey—for the most part independently, though my boss was always a great source for detailed feedback and inspiration for ideas to explore further. Through sitting in on team meetings and chatting individually with some of my coworkers, I got a sense of what the rest of the communications team was occupied with, whether it be PR or social media or marketing. The Field consistently made me feel welcomed throughout my internship, whether it was through invitations to watch a Travel Channel segment being filmed in the museum or getting to see how all of the exhibits are made. Though my time at the museum was brief, I loved the chance to explore all of the work that it takes to keep a major cultural institution running and how I might be able to fit into it.

Learn more about the Arts & Museums Fellows Program:

image

image

Alaina Murphy ‘14
Green School and Ibuku/PT Bamboo Pure
Bali, Indonesia

image

I spent the summer of 2013 in Bali, Indonesia. It is a land of beauty, art, and magic if this is how you choose to see it (and if so, isn’t at all difficult to see it this way). I left home on June 4 slightly broken – and returned home August 16 more mended than I have felt in quite some time.

There is power in knowing what you are looking for and power in not knowing at all.

What I mean by this is: For a long time I set myself on a path aiming for something that I thought I wanted. Running had become such a huge part of my life that I almost defined myself by it. As injuries followed my endeavors (always terrifically timed), I also defined myself by this brokenness as if in introduction I might as well have said, “Hi, I’m Broken.”

Read More

Student Blogger: Harvard Start-Up Fair Top 10

image

With 98+ organizations to consider, it’s hard to know where to begin. Here’s a list of ten start-ups our student blogger’s excited to see. Who’s on your list?

imageAcceptU: www.acceptu.com
What it is: A service that provides virtual admissions counseling (via Skype, phone, and email) to college, graduate, and MBA applicants.
Fun fact: More than 90% of AcceptU’s clients have been accepted to one of their top three choices.

image
Custora:
www.custora.com
What it is: A customer-centric marketing platform that helps e-commerce marketing teams acquire, retain, and segment their customers better. 
Fun fact: Some of their clients include top e-commerce companies like Etsy, Fab, Threadless, Revolve Clothing, and Birchbox.

imageHitBliss: www.hitbliss.com
What it is: A service for accessing premium digital content, including the latest movies, TV shows, and music.
Fun fact: By engaging with personalized brand videos on the HitBliss platform, you earn HitBliss “cash,” which allows you to watch content without intrusive ad interruptions.

Read More